Uiltje

Titel Kunstwerk:

Uiltje

Jaartal:

1989

Naam Kunstenaar:

Veld, Frans van der (1940)  

Soort Kunstwerk:

sculptuur

Locatie:

Kerkstraat, Hillegom

Herkomst:

Ter gelegenheid van de afronding van de renovatie van de Kerkstraat.

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Reply #1 on : Fri November 30, 2012, 15:52:06
Though advancements in tehogclony have changed the concept of audience participation from the artist and his audience in a space to the artist and the audience in a network, participation as a human activity is very similar whether it’s online or offline—even on the Internet most visitors do not contribute. Where online participation is interactive, however, it is not just the artist who has authorial control, but everyone; one goal of participation becomes knowledge sharing, but because each participant has his or her own biases and points-of-view, transparency is essential for success and longevity. But that’s not all: Group participation is best served when it is united by a clear goal and, as such, works best in small groups of people with similar subject interests or ideas. This brings up other questions: Does online participation spawn tribal behavior? In other words, does the ease at which the Internet allows us to participate in groups—passively (anonymously) at first, with interactivity a later decision—push people into smaller and more targeted social groups of their liking (or comfort zone), and withdraw from larger groups where different viewpoints have to be tolerated? Does it lead to crowdsourcing, where creativity can be democratically shared? I think the answer to both is yes, but what the social, political and economical consequences are is yet unfolding.